14 May 2019

Mitsubishi-Outlander (Aut)

Category Suv
People 5
Air Yes
Music Yes
Small Luggage 2
Large Luggage 2

Overview

With the exception of the range-topping GT model, the standard engine is a 2.4-liter I-4 engine that produces 166 hp and 162 lb-ft of torque and delivers an EPA-rated 25/30 mpg city/highway with front-wheel drive and 24/29 mpg with all-wheel drive (AWD). The GT trim utilizes a 224-hp, 215 lb-ft 3.0-liter V-6 that is only available in AWD and is rated at 20/27 mpg. The 2.4-liter is backed by a CVT while the V-6 is paired to a six-speed automatic. In Motor Trend testing, the Outlander 2.4 SEL (AWD) hit 60 mph in 9.2 seconds and stopped from 60 mph in a respectable 119 feet.

The 2018 Outlander comes standard with a 7.0-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, LED daytime running lights, heated side view mirrors, 18-inch wheels, seven-passenger seating, dual-zone climate control, and a leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift lever. Many available features are bundled together in the SEL Touring package that includes a multi-view camera system, adaptive cruise control, Forward Collision Mitigation, lane departure warning, automatic high beams, LED headlights and fog lights, heated steering wheel, a 710-watt Rockford-Fosgate sound system, blind-spot warning with lane change assist and rear cross-traffic alert, power glass moonroof, and a power remote liftgate.

Safety

The 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander received the highest five-star rating for the AWD model and four stars for the FWD version from the NHTSA for the crossover’s overall score. The Outlander is considered a 2017 Top Safety Pick+ (the highest designation) from the IIHS for receiving the highest rating of Good in all crash tests and the highest rating of Superior for the front crash prevention evaluation. The Superior rating was issued because the Outlander was able to avoid 12 mph and 25 mph frontal collisions thanks to the Forward Collision Mitigation System found in the previously mentioned Touring package that adds all available driver assist safety features.

What We Think

After one year with our long-term 2016 Mitsubishi Outlander SEL, we enjoyed the fact that the crossover gave us no issues, and was cheap to maintain. We did wish for more power from the equipped 2.4-liter I-4, as it would struggle with more than two people in the crossover, but the fuel economy was good. We liked the driver assist safety features but felt they were a little too sensitive and not as refined as other competitive systems. The interior was conservative and simple, the front seats were comfortable, but the third-row seats are very small, not made for adults. The 63.3 cubic feet of cargo space was great for fitting many things, but the power liftgate was slow to open and close. At the end of our long-term verdict, we said, “Our Outlander had a good amount of content for its $33,095 sticker price. But again, not all of those features work as well as those offered by the competition. I think the Outlander makes a more compelling case as a stripped-down base model. A front-wheel-drive 2017 Outlander ES is a great value at its $24,390 starting price because it offers more room than a Honda CR-V and has a standard third row for less money.”

During our First Drive review of the refreshed 2016 Outlander, we felt the crossover was quieter than the previous model year but still not as quiet as we would have liked. The interior was an improvement, especially the more comfortable front seats and the easier-to-fold-down rear seats. Equipped with the I-4, the crossover felt more nimble than the V-6 but needed more power. “The well-equipped SEL front-drive model starts at $25,845, and the V-6 AWD is still a value at $31,845. Will all the improvements, plus the value, add up to more interest from U.S. buyers? They’d be wise to consider the new crossover for its value.”

Cool Fact

The 2.4-liter I-4 has a towing capacity of 1,500 pounds, while the V-6 more than doubles that at 3,500 pounds.

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